Simple Design, Integrated Tests Are a Scam, Test Doubles, Surviving Legacy Code Comments

I’ve been teaching programmers about the value of isolated tests for a long time, and recently I’ve seen increasing resistance to the idea. I worry that this comes partly from having presented motivations and reasons that tends towards the overly-abstract, ironically enough. Perhaps I can improve matters by returning to the concrete issues and constraints that led me to being exploring this idea in the first place.

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Tutorials Comments
It took a day, but I managed to learn how to deploy a Jekyll blog to Heroku using GitLab CI, even though I'd never used GitLab CI before. This not only provides a tutorial, but also an example of applying a Learning Tests approach to something other than code running in a single process.

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Simple Design, Dependency Inversion Principle (DIP) Comments
We have standard workflows in our systems that programmers copy and paste from module to module in order to achieve some kind of standard behavior. Programmers call this boilerplate. If they extract the standard workflow from the boilerplate, then the copy/paste risk goes away, it becomes easier to gain confidence in the code, and everyone wins.

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Comments

I recently encountered a code base in which someone had applied the Golden Master technique, but done so in a way I find risky, so I wanted to warn you against letting this happen in your code. This code exhibits a bad idea that probably started out as a good idea or seemed like a good idea at the time. This makes it plausible-but-risky, and this is where a lot of legacy code comes from.

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Comments

Today I’d like to share an example of a tiny cohesion risk. I leave it to you to evaluate the severity of the risk and the appropriateness of the refactoring. I like to deal with risks when they are small enough that their impact, while painful, probably won’t kill.

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Dependency Inversion Principle (DIP) Comments

If you want reuse, you have to make it happen. Fortunately, you don’t need to be psychic; it’s enough to start by removing duplication, which makes opportunities for reuse easier to spot. Let me show you an example from code I’m working on to generate Nginx server block configurations I need to support some pretty URLs.

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Surviving Legacy Code, Dependency Inversion Principle (DIP) Comments

When you use relative include paths in your code, you bind each source code file to its current location in the project’s file layout. You relegate yourself to having to run it from a very specific location on the file system. You generally make it unnecessarily difficult to automate running your application (or its tests) outside your development environment, such as in platform-as-a-service environments. You make things like Docker not just helpful, but necessary.

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Design credit: Shashank Mehta